Hello world program

From Academic Kids

A "hello world" program is a computer program that prints out "Hello, world!" on a display device. It is used in many introductory tutorials for teaching a programming language and many students use it as their first programming experience in a language.

Such a program is typically one of the simplest programs possible in a computer language. Some are surprisingly complex, especially in some graphical user interface (GUI) contexts. Some others are very simple, however, especially those which rely heavily on a particular command line interpreter ("shell") to perform the actual output. In many embedded systems, the text may be sent to a one or two-line liquid crystal display (LCD) (and in yet other systems, a simple LED being turned on may substitute for "Hello world!").

A "hello world" program can be a useful sanity test to make sure that a language's compiler, development environment, and run-time environment are correctly installed. Configuring a complete programming toolchain from scratch to the point where even trivial programs can be compiled and run may involve substantial amounts of work. For this reason, a simple program is used first when testing a new tool chain.

While small test programs existed since the development of programmable computers, the tradition of using the phrase "Hello world!" as the test message was influenced by an example program in the book The C Programming Language, by Brian Kernighan and Dennis Ritchie, published in 1978. The example program from that book prints "hello, world" (i.e., no capital letters, no exclamation sign; those entered the tradition later). The book had inherited the program from a 1974 Bell Laboratories internal memorandum by Kernighan —Programming in C: A Tutorial— which shows the first known version of the program:

main( ) {
    printf("hello, world !");
}

However, the first known instance of the usage of the words "hello" and "world" together in computer literature is in A Tutorial Introduction to the Language B, by Brian Kernighan, 1973. [1] (http://cm.bell-labs.com/cm/cs/who/dmr/bintro.html)

There are many variations on the punctuation and casing of the phrase, and the examples on this page print out several of these variations. Variations include the presence or lack of the comma and exclamation mark, and the capitalisation of the 'H', both 'H' and 'W', or neither. The most commonly accepted variation, despite not being the original text, is "Hello, world!" Some languages are forced to implement different forms, such as "HELLO WORLD!," on systems that only support capital letters, while many "hello world" programs in esoteric languages print out a slightly modified string. "Hello world" programs also normally print a newline character or character sequence (either ASCII-10 or 13,10).

A collection of "hello world" programs written in various computer languages can serve as a very simple "Rosetta Stone" to assist in learning and comparing the languages. Keep in mind, however, that unless assembly language or similar very low-level (hardware-near) languages are involved, not much "computing" (calculation) is usually exhibited.

Here are some examples in different languages:

Contents

1.1 ABC
1.2 Ada
1.3 ALGOL 68
1.4 AmigaE
1.5 APL
1.6 Assembly language

1.7 AWK
1.8 BASIC

1.9 BCPL
1.10 BLISS
1.11 boo
1.12 Casio fx-7950
1.13 C
1.14 C#
1.15 C++
1.16 C++, Managed
1.17 ColdFusion (CFM)
1.18 COMAL
1.19 CIL
1.20 Clean
1.21 CLIST
1.22 Clipper
1.23 COBOL
1.24 Common Lisp
1.25 D
1.26 DCL batch
1.27 Dylan
1.28 Ed and Ex (Ed extended)
1.29 Eiffel
1.30 Erlang
1.31 Euphoria
1.32 F#
1.33 Factor
1.34 FOCAL
1.35 Focus
1.36 Forte TOOL
1.37 Forth
1.38 FORTRAN
1.39 Frink
1.40 Gambas
1.41 Game Maker
1.42 Haskell
1.43 Heron
1.44 HP-41 & HP-42S
1.45 HyperTalk (Apple HyperCard's scripting programming language)
1.46 IDL
1.47 Inform
1.48 Io
1.49 Iptscrae
1.50 Java
1.51 JVM
1.52 K
1.53 Kogut
1.54 Logo
1.55 Lua
1.56 M (MUMPS)
1.57 Macsyma, Maxima
1.58 Maple
1.59 Mathematica
1.60 MATLAB
1.61 Max
1.62 Modula-2
1.63 MS-DOS batch
1.64 MUF
1.65 Natural
1.66 Ncurses
1.67 Oberon
1.68 Objective C

1.69 OCaml
1.70 OPL
1.71 OPS5
1.72 OPS83
1.73 Pascal
1.74 PBASIC
1.75 Perl
1.76 PHP
1.77 Pike
1.78 PL/SQL
1.79 PL/I
1.80 POP-11
1.81 POV-Ray
1.82 Processing
1.83 Prolog
1.84 Python
1.85 REFAL
1.86 REXX, NetRexx, and Object REXX
1.87 RPL
1.88 Ruby
1.89 SAS
1.90 Sather
1.91 Scala
1.92 Scheme
1.93 sed
1.94 Self
1.95 Simula
1.96 Smalltalk
1.97 SML
1.98 SNOBOL
1.99 Span
1.100 SPARK
1.101 SPITBOL
1.102 SQL
1.103 STARLET
1.104 TACL
1.105 Tcl (Tool command language)
1.106 Turing
1.107 TSQL
1.108 UNIX-style shell

Text user interface (Known as TUI, console or line-oriented)


ABC

WRITE "Hello, World!"

Ada

with Ada.Text_IO;

procedure Hello is
begin
   Ada.Text_IO.Put_Line ("Hello, world!");
end Hello;

For explanation see wikibooks:Programming:Ada:Basic.

ALGOL 68

In the popular upper-case stropping convention for bold words:

BEGIN
    print(("Hello, World!", newline))
END

or using prime stropping suitable for punch cards:

'BEGIN'
    PRINT(("HELLO, WORLD!", NEWLINE))
'END'

AmigaE

PROC main()
   WriteF('Hello, World!')
ENDPROC

APL

'Hello World'

Assembly language

Accumulator-only architecture: DEC PDP-8, PAL-III assembler

See the example section of the PDP-8 article.

First successful P/OS combinations: Intel 8080/Zilog Z80, CP/M, RMAC assembler

bdos    equ    0005H    ; BDOS entry point
start:  mvi    c,9      ; BDOS function: output string
        lxi    d,msg$   ; address of msg
        call   bdos
        ret             ; return to CCP

msg$:   db    'Hello, world!$'
end     start

Accumulator + index register machine: MOS Technology 6502, CBM KERNAL, ca65 assembler

MSG:   .ASCIIZ "Hello, world!"
        LDX    #$F3
@LP:    LDA    MSG-$F3,X ; load character
        JSR    $FFD2     ; CHROUT (KERNAL), output to current output device (screen)
        INX
        BNE    @LP       ; 
        RTS

Accumulator/Index microcoded machine: Data General Nova, RDOS

See the example section of the Nova article.

Expanded accumulator machine: Intel x86, DOS, TASM

MODEL   SMALL
IDEAL
STACK   100H

DATASEG
        MSG DB 'Hello, world!', 13, '$'

CODESEG
        MOV AX, @data
        MOV DS, AX
        MOV DX, OFFSET MSG
        MOV AH, 09H      ; DOS: output ASCII$ string
        INT 21H
        MOV AX, 4C00H
        INT 21H
END

Expanded accumulator machine: Intel x86, Microsoft Windows, FASM

;Assumes that enviromnent variable %fasminc% is set
format PE GUI 4.0
include '%fasminc%\win32a.inc'
section '.code' code readable executable
invoke MessageBox,0,hellomsg,hellolb,MB_OK+MB_ICONINFORMATION
invoke ExitProcess,0
section '.data' data readable writable
hellomsg db 'Hello, World!',0
hellolb db 'Hello World',0
data import
library user32,'user32.dll',kernel32,'kernel32.dll'
include '%fasminc%\apia\user32.inc'
include '%fasminc%\apia\kernel32.inc'
end data

Expanded accumulator machine: Intel x86, Linux, GAS

.data
msg:
    .ascii     "Hello, world!\n"
    len = . - msg
.text
    .global _start
_start:
    movl	$len,%edx
    movl	$msg,%ecx
    movl	$1,%ebx
    movl	$4,%eax
    int	$0x80
    movl	$0,%ebx
    movl	$1,%eax
    int	$0x80

General-purpose fictional computer: MIX, MIXAL

TERM    EQU    19          console device no. (19 = typewriter)
        ORIG   1000        start address
START   OUT    MSG(TERM)   output data at address MSG
        HLT                halt execution
MSG     ALF    "HELLO"
        ALF    " WORL"
        ALF    "D    "
        END    START       end of program

General-purpose fictional computer: MMIX, MMIXAL

string  BYTE   "Hello, world!",#a,0   string to be printed (#a is newline and 0 terminates the string)
  Main  GETA   $255,string            get the address of the string in register 255
        TRAP   0,Fputs,StdOut         put the string pointed to by register 255 to file StdOut
        TRAP   0,Halt,0               end process

General-purpose-register CISC: DEC PDP-11, RT-11, MACRO-11

.MCALL  .REGDEF,.TTYOUT,.EXIT
        .REGDEF

HELLO:  MOV    #MSG,R1
        MOVB   (R1),R0
LOOP:  .TTYOUT
        MOVB  +(R1),R0
        BNE    LOOP
       .EXIT

MSG:   .ASCIZ  /HELLO, WORLD!/
       .END    HELLO

CISC on advanced multiprocessing OS: DEC VAX, VMS, MACRO-32

        .title    hello

        .psect    data, wrt, noexe

chan:   .blkw     1
iosb:   .blkq     1
term:   .ascid    "SYS$OUTPUT"
msg:    .ascii    "Hello, world!"
len =   . - msg

        .psect    code, nowrt, exe

        .entry    hello, ^m<>

        ; Establish a channel for terminal I/O
        $assign_s devnam=term, -
                  chan=chan
        blbc      r0, end

        ; Queue the I/O request
        $qiow_s   chan=chan, -
                  func=#io$_writevblk, -
                  iosb=iosb, -
                  p1=msg, -
                  p2=#len

        ; Check the status and the IOSB status
        blbc      r0, end
        movzwl    iosb, r0

        ; Return to operating system
end:    ret

       .end       hello

RISC processor: ARM, RISC OS, BBC BASIC's in-line assembler

.program         
         ADR R0,message
         SWI "OS_Write0"
         SWI "OS_Exit"
.message         
         DCS "Hello, world!"
         DCB 0
          ALIGN

or the even smaller version (from qUE);

         SWI"OS_WriteS":EQUS"Hello, world!":EQUB0:ALIGN:MOVPC,R14

AWK

BEGIN { print "Hello, world!" }

BASIC

The following example works for any ANSI/ISO-compliant BASIC implementation, as well as most implementations built into or distributed with microcomputers in the 1970s and 1980s (usually some variant of Microsoft BASIC).

10 PRINT "Hello, world!"
20 END

Such implementations of BASIC could also execute instructions in an immediate mode when line numbers are omitted. The following examples work without requiring a RUN instruction.

PRINT "Hello, world!"
? "Hello, world!"

Later implementations of BASIC allowed greater support for structured programming and did not require line numbers for source code. The following example works when RUN for the vast majority of modern BASICs.

PRINT "Hello, world!"
END

Again the "End" statement is optional in many BASICs.

TI-BASIC

On TI calculators of the TI-80 through TI-86 range:

:Disp "HELLO, WORLD!"    or    :Output(1,1,"HELLO, WORLD!")

Or simply

:"HELLO, WORLD!"

On TI-89/TI-92 calculators:

:hellowld()
:Prgm
:Disp "Hello, world!"
:EndPrgm

StarOffice/OpenOffice Basic

sub main
    print "Hello, World"
end sub

Visual Basic

Sub Main
  MsgBox "Hello World!"
End Sub

BCPL

GET "LIBHDR"

LET START () BE
$(
    WRITES ("Hello, world!*N")
$)

BLISS

%TITLE 'HELLO_WORLD'
MODULE HELLO_WORLD (IDENT='V1.0', MAIN=HELLO_WORLD,
        ADDRESSING_MODE (EXTERNAL=GENERAL)) =
BEGIN

    LIBRARY 'SYS$LIBRARY:STARLET';

    EXTERNAL ROUTINE
       LIB$PUT_OUTPUT;

GLOBAL ROUTINE HELLO_WORLD =
BEGIN

    LIB$PUT_OUTPUT(%ASCID %STRING('Hello World!'))
END;

END
ELUDOM

boo

print "Hello, world!"

Casio fx-7950

This program will work on the fx-9750 graphing calculator and compatibles.

"HELLO WORLD"

C

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
    printf("Hello, world!\n");
    return 0;
}

C#

class HelloWorldApp
{
    static void Main()
    {
        System.Console.WriteLine("Hello, world!");
    }
}

C++


#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    std::cout << "Hello, world!" << std::endl;
}

C++, Managed

#using <mscorlib.dll>

using namespace System;

int wmain()
{
    Console::WriteLine("Hello, world!");
    return 0;
}

ColdFusion (CFM)

<cfoutput>
Hello, world!
</cfoutput>

COMAL

PRINT "Hello, World!"

CIL

.method public static void Main() cil managed
{
     .entrypoint
     .maxstack 8
     ldstr "Hello, world!"
     call void [mscorlib]System.Console::WriteLine(string)
     ret
}

Clean

module hello

Start = "Hello, world"

CLIST

PROC 0
WRITE Hello, World!

Clipper

@1,1 say "Hello World!"

COBOL

IDENTIFICATION DIVISION.
PROGRAM-ID.     HELLO-WORLD.

ENVIRONMENT DIVISION.

DATA DIVISION.

PROCEDURE DIVISION.
DISPLAY "Hello, world!".
STOP RUN.

Common Lisp

(format t "Hello world!~%")

or

(write-line "Hello World!")

or merely:

 "Hello World!
 "

Atoms are programs too!

D

import std.stdio;
void main()
{
    writefln("Hello, world!");
}

DCL batch

$ write sys$output "Hello, world!"

Dylan

module: hello

format-out("Hello, world!\n");

Ed and Ex (Ed extended)

a
hello world!
.
p

or like so:

echo -e 'a\nhello world!\n.\np'|ed
echo -e 'a\nhello world!\n.\np'|ex

Eiffel

class HELLO_WORLD

creation
    make
feature
    make is
    local
            io:BASIC_IO
    do
            !!io
            io.put_string("%N Hello, world!")
    end -- make
end -- class HELLO_WORLD

Erlang

-module(hello).
-export([hello_world/0]).

hello_world() -> io:fwrite("Hello, world!\n").

Euphoria

puts(1, "Hello, world!")

F#

print_string "Hello world";
print_newline()

Factor

"Hello world" print

FOCAL

type "Hello, World!"!

or

t "Hello, World!"!

Focus

-TYPE Hello World

Forte TOOL

begin TOOL HelloWorld;

includes Framework;
HAS PROPERTY IsLibrary = FALSE;

forward  Hello;

-- START CLASS DEFINITIONS

class Hello inherits from Framework.Object

has public  method Init;

has property
    shared=(allow=off, override=on);
    transactional=(allow=off, override=on);
    monitored=(allow=off, override=on);
    distributed=(allow=off, override=on);

end class;
-- END CLASS DEFINITIONS

-- START METHOD DEFINITIONS

------------------------------------------------------------
method Hello.Init
begin
super.Init();

task.Part.LogMgr.PutLine('HelloWorld!');
end method;
-- END METHOD DEFINITIONS
HAS PROPERTY
    CompatibilityLevel = 0;
    ProjectType = APPLICATION;
    Restricted = FALSE;
    MultiThreaded = TRUE;
    Internal = FALSE;
    LibraryName = 'hellowor';
    StartingMethod = (class = Hello, method = Init);

end HelloWorld;

Forth

." Hello, world!" CR

FORTRAN

   PROGRAM HELLO
     PRINT *, 'Hello, world!'
   END

Frink

println["Hello, world!"]

Gambas

See also GUI section.

PUBLIC SUB Main()
  Print "Hello, world!"
END

Game Maker

In the draw event of some object:

draw_text(x,y,"Hello World")

Or to show a splash screen message:

show_message("Hello World")

Haskell

module Main (main) where

main = putStr "Hello World\n"

or

main = putStr "Hello World\n"

Heron

program HelloWorld;
functions {
  _main() {
    print_string("Hello, world!");
  }
}
end

HP-41 & HP-42S

(Handheld Hewlett-Packard RPN-based alphanumeric engineering calculators.)

01 LBLTHELLO

02 THELLO, WORLD

03 PROMPT

Missing image
Hp41helo.png
HP-41 output

HyperTalk (Apple HyperCard's scripting programming language)

put "Hello world"

Missing image
Hworld.gif
Hello, HyperCard World!

IDL

print,"Hello world!"

Inform

[ Main;
  print "Hello, world!^";
];

Io

"Hello world!" print

or

write("Hello world!\n")

Iptscrae

ON ENTER {
    "Hello, " "World!" & SAY
}

Java

See also GUI section.

public class Hello {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println("Hello, world!");
    }
}

JVM

(disassembler output of javap -c Hello.class)

public class Hello extends java.lang.Object {
    public Hello();
    public static void main(java.lang.String[]);
}

Method Hello()
   0 aload_0
   1 invokespecial #1 <Method java.lang.Object()>
   4 return

Method void main(java.lang.String[])
   0 getstatic #2 <Field java.io.PrintStream out>
   3 ldc #3 <String "Hello, world!">
   5 invokevirtual #4 <Method void println(java.lang.String)>
   8 return

K

`0:"Hello world\n"

Kogut

WriteLine "Hello, world!"

Logo

print [hello  world!]

or

pr [Hello World!]

In mswlogo only

messagebox [Hi] [Hello World]

Lua

print "Hello, world!"

M (MUMPS)

W "Hello, world!"

Macsyma, Maxima

print("Hello, world!")$

Maple

print("Hello, World!");

Mathematica

Print["Hello World"]

MATLAB

disp('Hello World')

Max

max v2;
#N vpatcher 10 59 610 459;
#P message 33 93 63 196617 Hello world!;
#P newex 33 73 45 196617 loadbang;
#P newex 33 111 31 196617 print;
#P connect 1 0 2 0;
#P connect 2 0 0 0;
#P pop;

Modula-2

MODULE Hello;

FROM Terminal2 IMPORT WriteLn; WriteString;

BEGIN
   WriteString("Hello, world!");
   WriteLn;
END Hello;

MS-DOS batch

(with the standard command.com interpreter. The @ symbol is optional and prevents the system from repeating the command before executing it. The @ symbol must be omitted on versions of MS-DOS prior to 3.0.)

@echo Hello, world!

MUF

: main
  me @ "Hello, world!" notify
;

Natural

WRITE "Hello, World!"
END

Ncurses

#include <ncurses.h>
int main()
{
    initscr();
    printw("Hello, world!");
    refresh();
    getch();
    endwin();
    return 0;
}

Oberon

MODULE Hello;
        IMPORT Oberon, Texts;
 VAR W: Texts.Writer;

 PROCEDURE World*;
 BEGIN
   Texts.WriteString(W, "Hello World!");
   Texts.WriteLn(W);
   Texts.Append(Oberon.Log, W.buf)
 END World;

BEGIN
 Texts.OpenWriter(W)
END Hello.

Objective C

Using the C library

#import <stdio.h>

//An object-oriented version.
@interface Hello : Object
{
   const char str[] = "Hello world";
}
- (id) hello (void);
@end

@implementation Hello
- (id) hello (void)
{
   printf("%s\n", str);
}
@end

int main(void)
{
   Hello *h = [Hello new];
   [h hello];
   
   [h free];
   return 0;
}

Using OPENSTEP/Cocoa

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

int main (int argc, const char * argv[])
{
   NSLog(@"Hello, World!");
   return 0;
}

OCaml

print_endline "Hello world!"

OPL

See also GUI section.

PROC hello:
  PRINT "Hello, World"
ENDP

OPS5

(object-class request
         ^action)

(startup
   (strategy MEA)
   (make request ^action hello)
)


(rule hello
   (request ^action hello)
   (write |Hello World!| (crlf))
)

OPS83

module hello (main)
{  procedure main( )
   {
      write() |Hello, world!|, '\n';
   };
};

Pascal

Program Hello(output);
begin
    WriteLn('Hello, world!');
end.

PBASIC

DEBUG "Hello, world!", CR

Or a blinking LED (it must be attached to the seventh output pin)

DO
    HIGH 7 'Make the 7th pin go high (turn the LED on)
    PAUSE 500 'Sleep for half a second
    LOW 7 ' Make the 7th pin go low (turn the LED off)
LOOP
END

Perl

print "Hello, world!\n";

(This is the first example in Learning Perl; the semicolon is optional.)


To access through the CGI:

#!/usr/bin/perl
print "Content-type: text/plain\n\n";
print "Hello, world\n";

PHP

<?php
 echo "Hello, world!\n";
?>

or

<?="Hello, world!\n"?>

but this is more recommended

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"
"http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">
<html>
<head>
<meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
</head>
<body>
<?php
 // Using full php tags is recommended. Avoid short tags
 echo 'Hello, world!'
?>
</body>
</html>

(Note: The second example will not work unless short open tags (http://fi.php.net/ini.core#ini.short-open-tag) are enabled.)

Pike

int main() {
    write("Hello, world!\n");
    return 0;
}

PL/SQL

procedure print_hello_world as
    dbms_output.enable(1000000);
    dbms_output.put_line("Hello World!");
end print_hello_world;

PL/I

Test: proc options(main) reorder;
  put skip edit('Hello, world!') (a);
end Test;

POP-11

'Hello world' =>

POV-Ray

#include "colors.inc"
camera {
  location <3, 1, -10>
  look_at <3,0,0>
}
light_source { <500,500,-1000> White }
text {
  ttf "timrom.ttf" "Hello world!" 1, 0
  pigment { White }
}

Processing

println("Hello world!");

Prolog

write('Hello world'),nl.

Python

print "Hello, world!"

REFAL

$ENTRY GO{=<Prout 'Hello, World!'>;}

REXX, NetRexx, and Object REXX

say "Hello, world!"

RPL

See also GUI section.

(On Hewlett-Packard HP-28, HP-48 and HP-49 series graphing calculators.)

<<
  CLLCD
  "Hello, World!" 1 DISP
  0 WAIT
  DROP
>>

Ruby

See also GUI section.

puts "Hello, world!"

SAS

data _null_;
put 'Hello World!';
run;

Sather

class HELLO_WORLD is
  main is 
   #OUT+"Hello World\n"; 
  end; 
end;

Scala

object HelloWorld with Application {
  Console.println("Hello, world!");
}

Scheme

(display "Hello, world!")
(newline)

sed

(note: requires at least one line of input)

sed -ne '1s/.*/Hello, world!/p'

Self

'Hello, World!' print.

Simula

BEGIN
    OutText("Hello World!");
    OutImage;
END

Smalltalk

Transcript show: 'Hello, world!'; cr

SML

print "Hello, world!\n";

SNOBOL

    OUTPUT = "Hello, world!"
END

Span

class Hello {
  static public main: args {
    Console << "Hello World!\n";
  }
}

SPARK

with Spark_IO;
--# inherit Spark_IO;
--# main_program;

procedure Hello_World
--# global in out Spark_IO.Outputs;
--# derives Spark_IO.Outputs from Spark_IO.Outputs;
is
begin
  Spark_IO.Put_Line (Spark_IO.Standard_Output, "Hello, world!", 0);
end Hello_World;

SPITBOL

    OUTPUT = "Hello, world!"
END

SQL

CREATE TABLE message (text char(15));
INSERT INTO message (text) VALUES ('Hello, world!');
SELECT text FROM message;
DROP TABLE message;

or (e.g. Oracle dialect)

SELECT 'Hello, world!' FROM dual;

or (for Oracle's PL/SQL proprietary procedural language)

BEGIN
  DBMS_OUTPUT.ENABLE(1000000);
  DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('Hello World, from PL/SQL');
END;

or (e.g. MySQL or PostgreSQL dialect)

SELECT 'Hello, world!';

or (e.g. T-SQL dialect)

PRINT 'Hello, world!'

or (for KB-SQL dialect)

select Null from DATA_DICTIONARY.SQL_QUERY

FOOTER or HEADER or DETAIL or FINAL event
write "Hello, world!"

STARLET

RACINE: HELLO_WORLD.

NOTIONS:
HELLO_WORLD : ecrire("Hello, world!").

TACL

#OUTPUT Hello, world!

Tcl (Tool command language)

See also GUI section.

puts "Hello, world!"

Turing

put "Hello, world!"

TSQL

Declare @Output varchar(16)
Set @Output='Hello, world!'
Select @Output

or, simpler variations:

Select 'Hello, world!'
Print 'Hello, world!'

UNIX-style shell

echo 'Hello, world!'

or

printf 'Hello, world!\n'

or for a curses interface:

dialog --msgbox 'Hello, world!' 0 0

Graphical user interfaces (GUIs)


ActionScript (Macromedia flash mx)

trace ("hello, world!")

AppleScript

display dialog "Hello, world!"

Or to have the OS synthesize it and literally say "hello world!" (with no comma, as that would cause the synthesizer to pause)

say "Hello world!"

Cocoa or GNUStep (In Objective C)

#import <Cocoa/Cocoa.h>
@interface hello : NSObject {
}
@end

@implementation hello

-(void)awakeFromNib
{	
     NSBeep(); // we don't need this but it's conventional to beep 
               // when you show an alert
     NSRunAlertPanel(@"Message from your Computer", @"Hello, world!", @"Hi!",
                     nil, nil);
}

@end

Delphi,Kylix

Program Hello_World;
uses    Windows;
   
Begin
ShowMessage("Hello, world!");
End.

FLTK2 (in C++)

#include <fltk/Window.h>
#include <fltk/Widget.h>
#include <fltk/run.h>
using namespace fltk;
   
int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    Window *window = new Window(300, 180);
    window->begin();
        Widget *box = new Widget(20, 40, 260, 100, "Hello, World!");
        box->box(UP_BOX);
        box->labelfont(HELVETICA_BOLD_ITALIC);
        box->labelsize(36);
        box->labeltype(SHADOW_LABEL);
     window->end();
     window->show(argc, argv);

    return run();
}

Gambas

See also TUI section.

PUBLIC SUB Main()
  Message.Info("Hello, world!")
END

Missing image
Gambashelloworld.png
Image:gambashelloworld.png

GTK toolkit (in C++)

#include <iostream>
#include <gtkmm/main.h>
#include <gtkmm/button.h>
#include <gtkmm/window.h>
using namespace std;

class HelloWorld : public Gtk::Window {
public:
  HelloWorld();
  virtual ~HelloWorld();
protected:
  Gtk::Button m_button;
  virtual void on_button_clicked();
};

HelloWorld::HelloWorld()
: m_button("Hello, world!") {
    set_border_width(10);
    m_button.signal_clicked().connect(SigC::slot(*this,
                                      &HelloWorld::on_button_clicked));
    add(m_button);
    m_button.show();
}

HelloWorld::~HelloWorld() {}

void HelloWorld::on_button_clicked() {
    cout << "Hello, world!" << endl;
}

int main (int argc, char *argv[]) {
    Gtk::Main kit(argc, argv);
    HelloWorld helloworld;
    Gtk::Main::run(helloworld);
    return 0;
}

GTK toolkit (in Python)

#!/usr/bin/env python
from gtk import *
window = Window(WINDOW_TOPLEVEL)
vbox = VBox()
window.add(vbox)
vbox.pack_start(Label("Hello World!"))
button = Button("OK")
button.connect("clicked", lambda widget: main_quit())
vbox.pack_end(button)
window.show_all()
main()

GTK# (in C#)

using Gtk;
using GtkSharp;
using System;

class Hello {

    static void Main()
    {
        Application.Init ();

        Window window = new Window ("helloworld");
        window.Show();

        Application.Run ();

    }
}

GTK 2.x (in Euphoria)

include gtk2/wrapper.e

Info(NULL,"Hello","Hello World!")

Missing image
EuphoriaHelloWorld.png
Image:EuphoriaHelloWorld.png

Java

See also TUI section.

import javax.swing.JOptionPane;

public class Hello {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "Hello, world!");
    }
}

Missing image
HelloJava.png
Image:HelloJava.png

Java applet

Java applets work in conjunction with HTML files.
<HTML>
<HEAD>
<TITLE>Hello World</TITLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY>

HelloWorld Program says:

<APPLET CODE="HelloWorld.class" WIDTH=600 HEIGHT=100>
</APPLET>

</BODY>
</HTML>
import java.applet.*;
import java.awt.*;

public class HelloWorld extends Applet {
  public void paint(Graphics g) {
    g.drawString("Hello, world!", 100, 50);
  }
}

JavaScript and JScript

JavaScript (an implementation of ECMAScript) is a client-side scripting language used in HTML files. The following code can be placed in any HTML file:
<script type="text/javascript"><!--
function helloWorld()
{
    alert("Hello, world!");
}
//--></script>

<a href="#" onclick="helloWorld(); return false;">Hello World Example</a>
An easier method uses JavaScript implicitly, directly calling the reserved alert function. Cut and paste the following line inside the <body> .... </body> HTML tags.
<a href="#" onclick="alert('Hello, world!'); return false;">Hello World Example
</a>
An even easier method involves using popular browsers' support for the virtual 'javascript' protocol to execute JavaScript code. Enter the following as an Internet address (usually by pasting into the address box):
javascript:alert('Hello, world!');

Image:js-hello_world.png

There are many other ways:
javascript:document.write('Hello, world!\n');

K

This creates a window labeled "Hello world" with a button labeled "Hello world".

hello:hello..l:"Hello world"
hello..c:`button
`show$`hello

OPL

See also TUI section.

(On Psion Series 3 and later compatible PDAs.)

PROC guihello:
  ALERT("Hello, world!","","Exit")
ENDP

or

PROC hello:
   dINIT "Window Title"
   dTEXT "","Hello World"
   dBUTTONS "OK",13
   DIALOG
ENDP

Qt toolkit (in C++)

#include <qapplication.h>
#include <qpushbutton.h>
#include <qwidget.h>
#include <iostream>

class HelloWorld : public QWidget
{
    Q_OBJECT

public:
    HelloWorld();
    virtual ~HelloWorld();
public slots:
    void handleButtonClicked();
    QPushButton *mPushButton;
};

HelloWorld::HelloWorld() :
    QWidget(),
    mPushButton(new QPushButton("Hello, World!", this))
{
    connect(mPushButton, SIGNAL(clicked()), this, SLOT(handleButtonClicked()));
}

HelloWorld::~HelloWorld() {}

void HelloWorld::handleButtonClicked()
{
    std::cout << "Hello, World!" << std::endl;
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    QApplication app(argc, argv);
    HelloWorld helloWorld;
    app.setMainWidget(&helloWorld);
    helloWorld.show();
    return app.exec();
}

REALbasic

MsgBox "Hello, world!"

RPL

See also TUI section.

(On Hewlett-Packard HP-48G and HP-49G series calculators.)


<< "Hello, World!" MSGBOX >>

RTML

Hello ()
TEXT "Hello, world!"

SWT

import org.eclipse.swt.SWT;
import org.eclipse.swt.layout.RowLayout;
import org.eclipse.swt.widgets.Display;
import org.eclipse.swt.widgets.Shell;
import org.eclipse.swt.widgets.Label;

public class SWTHello {
    public static void main (String [] args) {
        Display display = new Display ();
        final Shell shell = new Shell(display);
        RowLayout layout = new RowLayout();
        layout.justify = true;
        layout.pack = true;
        shell.setLayout(layout);
        shell.setText("Hello, World!");
        Label label = new Label(shell, SWT.CENTER);
        label.setText("Hello, World!");
        shell.pack();
        shell.open ();
        while (!shell.isDisposed ()) {
            if (!display.readAndDispatch ()) display.sleep ();
        }
        display.dispose ();
    }
}

Missing image
SWT_Hello_World.gif
Image:SWT Hello World.gif

Tcl/Tk

See also TUI section.

label .l -text "Hello, world!"
pack .l

Visual Basic incl VBA

Sub Main()
    MsgBox "Hello, world!"
End Sub

Windows API (in C)

#include <windows.h>

LRESULT CALLBACK WindowProcedure(HWND, UINT, WPARAM, LPARAM);

char szClassName[] = "MainWnd";
HINSTANCE hInstance;

int WINAPI WinMain(HINSTANCE hInst, HINSTANCE hPrevInstance, LPSTR lpCmdLine,
                   int nCmdShow)
{
  HWND hwnd;
  MSG msg;
  WNDCLASSEX wincl;

  hInstance = hInst;

  wincl.cbSize = sizeof(WNDCLASSEX);
  wincl.cbClsExtra = 0;
  wincl.cbWndExtra = 0;
  wincl.style = 0;
  wincl.hInstance = hInstance;
  wincl.lpszClassName = szClassName;
  wincl.lpszMenuName = NULL; //No menu
  wincl.lpfnWndProc = WindowProcedure;
  wincl.hbrBackground = (HBRUSH)(COLOR_WINDOW + 1); //Color of the window
  wincl.hIcon = LoadIcon(NULL, IDI_APPLICATION); //EXE icon
  wincl.hIconSm = LoadIcon(NULL, IDI_APPLICATION); //Small program icon
  wincl.hCursor = LoadCursor(NULL, IDC_ARROW); //Cursor

  if (!RegisterClassEx(&wincl))
        return 0;

  hwnd = CreateWindowEx(0, //No extended window styles
        szClassName, //Class name
        "", //Window caption
        WS_OVERLAPPEDWINDOW & ~WS_MAXIMIZEBOX,
        CW_USEDEFAULT, CW_USEDEFAULT, //Let Windows decide the left and top
                                      //positions of the window
        120, 50, //Width and height of the window,
        NULL, NULL, hInstance, NULL);

  //Make the window visible on the screen
  ShowWindow(hwnd, nCmdShow);

  //Run the message loop
  while (GetMessage(&msg, NULL, 0, 0)>0)
  {
        TranslateMessage(&msg);
        DispatchMessage(&msg);
  }
  return msg.wParam;
}

LRESULT CALLBACK WindowProcedure(HWND hwnd, UINT message,
                                 WPARAM wParam, LPARAM lParam)
{
  PAINTSTRUCT ps;
  HDC hdc;
  switch (message)
  {
  case WM_PAINT:
        hdc = BeginPaint(hwnd, &ps);
        TextOut(hdc, 15, 3, "Hello, world!", 13);
        EndPaint(hwnd, &ps);
        break;
  case WM_DESTROY:
        PostQuitMessage(0);
        break;
  default:
        return DefWindowProc(hwnd, message, wParam, lParam);
  }
  return 0;
}

Or, much more simply:

#include <windows.h>
int WINAPI WinMain(HINSTANCE hInst, HINSTANCE hPrevInstance, LPSTR lpCmdLine,
                   int nCmdShow)
{
    MessageBox(NULL, "Hello, world!", "", MB_OK);
    return 0;
}

Windows Script Host

WScript.Echo "Hello, world!"

Ruby with WxWidgets

See also TUI section.

require 'wxruby'

class HelloWorldApp < Wx::App
 def on_init
  ourFrame = Wx::Frame.new(nil, -1, "Hello, world!").show
  ourDialogBox = Wx::MessageDialog.new(ourFrame, "Hello, world!", "Information:", \
                 Wx::OK|Wx::ICON_INFORMATION).show_modal
 end
end

HelloWorldApp.new.main_loop

XUL

Type the following in a text file (e.g. hello.world.xul) and then open with Mozilla Firefox.

<window xmlns="http://www.mozilla.org/keymaster/gatekeeper/there.is.only.xul">
  <box align="center" pack="center" flex="1">
    <description>Hello, world</description>
  </box>
</window>

Esoteric programming languages

See: Hello world program in esoteric languages

Document formats

ASCII

The following sequence of characters, expressed in hexadecimal notation (with carriage return and newline characters at end of sequence):

48 65 6C 6C 6F 2C 20 77 6F 72 6C 64 21 0D 0A

The following sequence of characters, expressed as binary numbers (with cr/nl as above, and the same ordering of bytes):

0007: 01001000 01100101 01101100 01101100 01101111 00101100 00100000 01110111
080E: 01101111 01110010 01101100 01100100 00100001 00001101 00001010

LaTeX

\documentclass{article}
\begin{document}
  Hello, world!
\end{document}

XHTML 1.1

(Using UTF-8 character set.)

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.1//EN"
                      "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml11/DTD/xhtml11.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xml:lang="en">
  <head>
    <title>Hello, world!</title>
  </head>
  <body>
    <p>Hello, world!</p>
  </body>
</html>

Page description languages

HTML

(simple)
<html><body>
<h1>Hello, world!<p>
</body></html>

<html> and <body>-tags are not necessary for informal testing, <h1> should end with </h1> or <p>. You could even use the following

<pre>Hello, World!</pre>

or simple write it as text without tags.

HTML 4.01 Strict

(full)
<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Strict//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd">
<html>
   <head>
    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1">
    <title>Hello, World!</title>
   </head>
   <body>
    <p>Hello, world!</p>
   </body>
</html>

XSL 1.0

(Using UTF-8 character set.)

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8">
<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
    xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform&quot;>
  <xsl:output method="xml" encoding="utf-8"
    doctype-system="http://www.w3.org/TR/2000/REC-xhtml1-20000126/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd&quot;
    doctype-pubilc="-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN"/>
  <xsl:template match="/">
    <html>
      <head>
        <title>Hello World</title>
      </head>
      <body>
        Hello World
      </body>
    </html>
  </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

PostScript

% Displays on console.
(Hello world!) =

% Displays as page output.
/Courier findfont
24 scalefont
setfont
100 100 moveto
(Hello world!) show
showpage

RTF

{\rtf1\ansi\deff0
{\fonttbl {\f0 Courier New;}}
\f0\fs20 Hello, world!
}

TeX

Hello World
\bye

See also

External links

cs:Hello world da:Hello world-program de:Hallo-Welt-Programm et:Hello world es:Hola mundo fr:Hello world id:Hello world ia:Hello World it:Hello world hu:Hell Vilg program nl:Hello world ja:Hello world no:Hello World pl:Hello world pt:Programa Ol Mundo ro:Program Hello, world! ru:Программа Hello world sv:Hello, World! vi:Chào thế giới! zh:Hello World程序

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